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Vol. 26 No. 6
November-December 2004

Making an imPACt | Recent IUPAC technical reports and recommendations that affect the many fields of pure and applied chemistry.
See also www.iupac.org/publications/pac

Quantities, Terminology, and Symbols in Photothermal and Related Spectroscopies
(IUPAC Recommendations 2004)

M. Terazima et al.

Pure and Applied Chemistry
Vol. 76, No. 6, pp. 1083–1118 (2004)

The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter causes absorption, emission, and scattering of radiation. Except for emission and scattering, the absorbed electromagnetic energy is converted to heat by various nonradiative processes and induces changes in temperature, pressure, and refractive index of the medium. In photothermal spectroscopy, the effects caused by these changes are monitored by various methods. The discovery of the photothermal effect dates back to Bell’s discovery of the photoacoustic effect in 1880, but it is after the invention of the laser that the photothermal spectroscopies became popular. In 1964, Gordon et al. found a beam divergence effect from liquid samples that were placed in a gas laser cavity. This phenomenon was correctly interpreted in terms of the “thermal lens” effect produced by heating induced by the Gaussian laser beam. The thermal lens method soon became a standard technique to detect the thermal energy produced by nonradiative transitions. Since then, various types of photothermal methods have been developed and applied to a variety of problems. Today, photothermal spectroscopy is widely used in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering.

Relations among the origins and detection methods of photothermal effects, which are caused by the heating effect after photoirradiation.

This paper presents quantities, terminology, and symbols of terms related to photothermal phenomena and used in photothermal and related spectroscopies. The terms used in the literature to describe photothermal phenomena and methods are reviewed, and a glossary of terms is given. The origins of photothermal phenomena, as well as the relations among various photothermal effects, are summarized. The listed terms cover the terminology in transient grating, transient lens, photoacoustic spectroscopy, photothermal radiometry, calorimetry, interferometry, deflection, reflection, and other related spectroscopies, which use or are related to photothermal effects.

www.iupac.org/publications/pac/2004/7606/7606x1083.html


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